Archives For Washfountains

Back in April of 2002 on a block between St. James Street and Mit Stegall Drive in Winnipeg, Canada, you would have stumbled upon a demolition scene that gave the feeling that you were in a post-apocalyptic time. However, on a gray day in April, amongst the rubble, a passerby found something rather interesting. A Bradley Washfountain was the lone survivor of the demolition of the Canada Metal Complex.

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The original Washfountain dates back to 1921. This revolutionary product changed handwashing in many factories and commercial washrooms. Each Bradley Washfountain could replace eight china sinks saving water, space and break time spent in the washroom.  It is no surprise that Canada Metal installed a Bradley Washfountain in their complex, but the mystery is why was it saved? Where is it now?

Using pictures the passerby provided, it was easy to locate the address of the picture taken in 2002.  As you can tell by the picture below there is a business named “Best West Pet Foods” near the location of the Fountain. A search provided an address and thanks to Google Earth a picture of the area 10 years later is also shown below. The rubble is gone and in its place is a large parking lot serving a “Real Canadian Superstore”. The Bradley Washfountain is since gone but the small blue box on the 2012 picture gives you an idea of where it would have been located 10 years ago.

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April 13th, 2002

 

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May 2012, Google Earth

 

Did someone think it was too unique destroy? Was it going to be recycled? Or, did the construction guys just become too lazy to move it the last 20 yards to the dumpster? Why the fountain was sitting there amongst the destruction we might never know. However, this picture illustrates the craftsmanship, innovation and quality Bradley invests into every one of its products. Even amid chaos, Bradley products stand strong.

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Flashback Friday: The Bradley sinks.
Happy Friday to you all! Check out this week’s flashback Friday photo! Tweet us @bradleycorp and let us know if you recognize anyone in these photos.

Hope you all had a good week. Enjoy the long weekend!

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Bradley’s Flashback Friday

Each Friday, a little piece of Bradley Corporation’s history will be showcased on our blog. Most of these flashback features will be fun, historic advertisements and catalog covers of Bradley products. Stay tuned each week for something different!

The Washfountain was one of the coolest places for kids to hang out in the 80’s.And plaid was clearly the latest fashion trend. What was your favorite 80’s  trend? Teased hair? Neon colors? I know I was particularly fond my knew high socks. 

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Bradley’s Flashback Friday
Each Friday, a little piece of Bradley Corporation’s history will be showcased on our blog. Most of these flashback features will be fun, historic advertisements and catalog covers of Bradley products. Stay tuned each week for something different!

What are the best washfountains for schools?

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Terreon Multi-fount

The Terreon® Multi-Founts™ are better suited to the school restroom environment than any other washroom fixture. They are easy to maintain, reliable, extremely vandal resistant, and they look good too. There are other fixtures that are suitable for school restrooms, but they don’t fit as well, or as universally, as the Terreon Multi-founts.

Terreon and TerreonRE® (25% pre-consumer recycled material and bio-based resin) are stain, scratch, impact resistant and both have GREENGUARD Indoor Air Quality Certification and GREENGUARD Children & Schools TM Certification from the GREENGUARD Environmental Institute. The integral bowl and sprayhead are easy to clean because there are no seams to trap dirt and debris. The 24v infrared provides the most reliable infrared control in the plumbing industry. Infrared sensors work by emitting invisible infrared light at a certain frequency and completing the circuit when that light is reflected back to the sensor at the same frequency. There are two reasons the infrared controls in the Multi-Founts are so reliable. First the emitter and sensor are aimed down into the bowl so they are not affected by other infrared sources in the room and will not sense objects outside the bowl area. Second the emitter and sensor are more than an inch apart, further apart than they are on any competitor’s fixture, so the activation area is more precise since the sensor only detects the presence of the user’s hands where it crosses the path of the infrared light being emitted.

The Terreon Multi-Founts are extremely vandal resistant. There are only three exposed fasteners and they require a hex key. The tough Terreon material and reliable infrared activation also discourage vandalism. Reliable fixtures are less likely to suffer from vandalism. Scratches and stains that don’t wash off with standard commercial or household cleaners can be removed with mild abrasives and the original finish can be restored with a maroon Scotch-Brite® pad. The Lexan widows for the infrared sensors are less than ¼” in diameter making them nearly impossible to break and they screw into the back side of the sprayhead so they cannot be removed from the front of the fixture.

The Multi-Founts are available in twenty-nine Terreon and TerreonRE colors to fit any restroom design. There are eleven standard colors, with ten designer colors and eight TerreonRE colors available for a small up charge. The Terreon Multi-Founts are available in two, three, or four station models and require less wall space than a comparable number of conventional lavatories. Wall mounted versions of the three and four station models are available to make floor cleaning easier.

For their aesthetics, safety, reliability, durability, vandal resistance, and color selection the Terreon Multi-Fount are simply best hand washing fixtures available for schools.

Author: Arnie Wilke, Sr. Product Applications Manager, Bradley Corporation

This is the final post in our 4 part series on our Washfountain bowl materials. Each Friday throughout September we featured a particular material and explaining what makes it special and why you might choose it over other available options.

Week 4: Bradstone

Bradstone WashfountainBradstone is a thermo set plastic formed under heat and pressure.  It is stain resistant, but the finish will be damaged by abrasive cleansers and, once damaged, the finish cannot be restored.  Bradstone is also very chemical resistant and will not be damaged by acid chemicals or chloride compounds.  After many years of abuse the bowl may get scratched and stained, but it’s not uncommon to see forty-year old Bradstone bowls still in service.  Because it’s light weight and low in cost, Bradstone works well for retrofit applications in manufacturing and repair facilities.

Read the other posts in this series
Week 1: Terrazzo
Week 2: Stainless Steel
Week 3: Terreon
Week 4: Bradstone

This post is the third in a 4 part series on our Washfountain bowl materials. Each Friday throughout September we’re featuring a particular material and explaining what makes it special and why it might work better in certain applications than another material choice.

Week 3: Terreon

Terreon Solid Surface WashfountainTerreon Solid Surface Material is made from a modified polyester resin with aluminum tri-hydrate and mineral fillers. It is certified by the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) to the ANSI standards Z124.3, Z124.6, and ANSI/ICPA SS-1-2001 for sinks and solid-surface material. Terreon is extremely stain resistant, chemical resistant, and reparable. Mild abrasives can be used to remove stubborn stains and scratches and restore the original finish. These properties make Terreon the most versatile bowl material and it can be used for almost any application where heavy-duty hand and arm washing is required.

Stay tuned for the final installment of the Washfountain material series next week!

Read the other posts in this series
Week 1: Terrazzo
Week 2: Stainless Steel
Week 3: Terreon
Week 4: Bradstone

This is the second of a 4 part series on our Washfountain bowl materials. Each Friday throughout September we’re featuring a particular material and explaining what makes it special and why it might work better in certain applications than another material choice.

Week 2: Stainless Steel

Stainless Steel WashfountainStainless steel is most often chosen for its durability and light weight.  Most customers are familiar with  stainless steel, but aren’t aware that acid chemicals, chloride compounds, steel wool cleaning pads, and ferrous metal filings can make stainless steel rust.  Abrasive cleaners can be used to remove stubborn stains from stainless steel.  It is the second most expensive material and is most often used in manufacturing, food processing, and medical facilities.  It’s a good choice where stain resistance is the most important feature.

Stay tuned for info about the other Washfountain materials Bradley has available!

Read the other posts in this series
Week 1: Terrazzo
Week 3: Stainless Steel
Week 3: Terreon
Week 4: Bradstone

This post is the first of a 4 part series on our Washfountain bowl materials. Each Friday throughout September we’ll be featuring a particular material and explaining what makes it special and why you might choose it over other available options.

Week 1: Terrazzo

Terrazzo WashfountainTerrazzo is a combination of crushed limestone and Portland cement.  It is the most expensive material Bradley offers and is often chosen for its beauty.  The weight (800 lbs for a 54” circle) and monolithic look deter vandalism.  The bowl finish does require some maintenance.  As long as the finish is maintained the bowls are stain resistant.  Abrasive cleaners cannot be used as they will remove the polyurethane finish that protects the bowl.  Terrazzo is most often used in manufacturing facilities and schools.

Stay tuned for info about the other Washfountain materials Bradley has available!

Read the other posts in this series
Week 1: Terrazzo
Week 2: Stainless Steel
Week 3: Terreon
Week 4: Bradstone